As a business, one of the most important decisions that you can make revolves around waste minimisation. Getting rid of waste in large quantities is very important, because every business needs to maximize their supplies. When you become used to wastage, it can impact on the quality of your business in a drastic sense. To avoid that, you want to develop a series of effective waste minimisation strategies.

To help you get started, here are some useful ideas that could play a role in reducing waste. Now, your business can more from the supplies it invests in.

Stop cutting corners in production

One of the main reasons for waste is that companies can try to cut corners and save on costs at the same time. Whilst this might seem an enviable goal, it rarely works out in the way that you would have hoped. Often, cutting corners means using a lower quality of product. This can lead to more wastage due to quicker wear and tear, poor performance in manufacturing, and other such issues.

If you want to keep your business thriving, then you should look to invest in a better quality of product as part of your supply chain. This will reduce your contribution to waste and it will ensure that every penny spent on supplies is more likely to be used to benefit your business in the years to come.

Not only that, but your customers will appreciate the fact that your products are produced to a higher standard. If your business is in the production or manufacturing industry, then working with a higher quality of material is essential. Cutting corners is not really something that can benefit your business in the long run, especially when it comes to trying to implement waste minimisation strategies.

Stop ordering in excess

Regardless of what kind of business you run, it is likely that you look to stock up on the items you use on a regular basis to excessive amounts. Many of us look to predict supply and demand by having a huge supply of in-demand items. However, to avoid waste, you should look to find a way to buy resources which covers your needs in a more effective manner.

This might mean reducing your supply delivery on a daily basis, or having staggered deliveries. This is useful because it allows you to have a more effective solution for keeping your actual quantity that is in use to a correct level.

For example, any business within the catering and hospitality industry wants to see their products last for as long as possible. However, you also do not want to be caught short with lack of supply on any given day. This creates a headache, yes?

While always hard to find a balance, you should look to keep your orders realistic. Instead of ordering an everyday supply to meet your best-ever performance, look to find a more balanced average. This can reduce waste and thus maximise investment.

Change your approach to packaging

If your business deals with packaging, especially disposable packaging, then you need to find a solution to this. If your business overpacks then it can lead to larger waste production. So, try and invest in items like reusable or recyclable containment packaging that can be used. This is important for things like shipping products from A to B, as well as ensuring that your customers are not left with a needless excess of packaging.

You will save money by using reusable packaging for delivering your products from your facility to your point of sale. Also, you will ensure that your waste produce is not higher than needed because customers will receive products in a way that is far less challenging to get rid of in the future.

This has the bonus of making sure that you are giving people a packaging option that is strong, secure, and also suitable for recycling. At the same time, having containers that can be used for shipping your items from your facility to the point of sale means you can use those delivery items again and again, ensuring you do not have to keep shelling out for delivery shipment containers.

Invest in waste stream auditing

Another useful waste minimisation strategy is to invest in waste source reduction. This means that you look to understand where your waste actually goes, and what produces the bulk of your waste. For example, a restaurant might find that waste produce from preparation is the bulk cause. A manufacturing firm might find that packaging is the biggest contributor.

You should invest in a waste stream audit as this can give you a good idea of what the source of the majority of your waste actually is. You can then spend more time coming up with a plan via your suppliers and contributors to find a way to reduce waste in that particular field.

Don’t try to get rid of everything all at once, however. You should instead spend more time looking into waste audit streaming methods, so you can better understand what has to go and what should stay. This is especially wise when you want to understand where the waste is coming from so that you can then work with other third parties to find a solution.

Waste auditing allows you to see where the problems stem from, allowing you to make a quick decision on a solution.

Tackle your waste problem today and benefit in the long run

Investing in waste minimisation strategies is a great way to deliver a meaningful return on investment in the years to come. Over time, you will find that waste is easier to manage purely because you have a strategy in place to avoid excess in the first place!

Many companies find they have excessive waste that they can struggle to deal with. By having a waste minimisation strategy in place, though, you can easily contend with the issue. Now that you know where the problems begin, it becomes much easier to find a satisfying end. Which waste minimisation strategies will you look to implement, then?

IEMA Courses

This course will provide learners with a foundation of environmental and sustainability knowledge to build on. Covering a wide range of environmental, sustainability and governance principles, this course will give learners an understanding of the breadth of the sustainability agenda, and the management tools and skills that they will need when working within this area.

  • Learners who are starting out in environmental management, and want a solid foundation of environment and sustainability knowledge to build on.
  • Those who would like to gain Associate membership of IEMA.
  • There are no formal entry requirements for this course.

Once completed, a learner on this course will be able to:

  • Outline the implications of global trends for the environment, for society, for the economy and for organisations
  • Outline sustainable business/governance principles and their relationship with organisations, products and services
  • Outline environmental principles and their relationship with organisations, products and services
  • Outline major policy and legislation and their implications for organisations, products and services
  • Outline major tools, techniques, systems and practices used to improve sustainability performance
  • Outline the role of innovation and other leading practices in developing sustainable products and services and providing sustainable solutions
  • Collect data, perform analysis, and evaluate information Research and plan to provide sustainable solutions
  • Deliver effective communication and capture feedback
  • Engage with stakeholders
  • Outline tools and techniques that identify opportunities and risks
  • Identify and propose ways to improve performance
  • Support change and transformation to improve sustainability

This is a 40-hour course (5 Days) Which includes an hour of online multiple-choice exam, taken at the end of the course.

The Environmental Sustainability Skills for Managers course aims to provide supervisors and managers with a strategic and operational overview of environmental sustainability as it affects their specific industry and work area.

  • This course is ideally suited for supervisors and managers across all sectors and has no formal entry requirements.

The course covers the understanding of the strategic opportunities and constraints that environmental sustainability presents organisations; the importance of resource efficiency; the impact of environmental sustainability across the value chain; the impacts of pollution, prevention, control and environmental legislation in organisations; and how employees support environmental sustainability.

14 Guided Learning Hours/2 Days.

The Environmental Sustainability Skills for the Workforce course is perfect for those working in any job role across all sectors, to ensure that environmental sustainability is embedded into all job roles of a company

  • This course is ideally suited for those working in any job role across all sectors and has no formal entry requirements. It is bench-marked against the Level 2 RQF descriptors.

The course covers the main environmental risks and opportunities facing organisations; the importance of resource efficiency; the impacts of pollution, prevention, control and legislation; the impact of transport; and knowing how employees can support environmental sustainability.

7 Guided Learning Hours/1 Day.

Request a call from the team for details.